A Tortilla Is Like Life: Food and Culture in the San Luis by Carole M. Counihan

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By Carole M. Counihan

Located within the southern San Luis Valley of Colorado, the distant and comparatively unknown city of Antonito is domestic to an overwhelmingly Hispanic inhabitants suffering not just to exist in an economically depressed and politically marginalized region, but in addition to maintain their tradition and their lifeways. among 1996 and 2006, anthropologist Carole Counihan accumulated food-centered lifestyles histories from nineteen Mexicanas—Hispanic American women—who had long-standing roots within the higher Rio Grande sector. The interviews during this groundbreaking examine considering southern Colorado Hispanic foodways—beliefs and behaviors surrounding nutrients creation, distribution, coaching, and consumption.

In this ebook, Counihan good points vast excerpts from those interviews to offer voice to the ladies of Antonito and spotlight their views. 3 strains of inquiry are framed: feminist ethnography, Latino cultural citizenship, and Chicano environmentalism. Counihan records how Antonito's Mexicanas identify a feeling of position and belonging via their wisdom of land and water and use this data to maintain their households and groups. ladies play a big function by means of gardening, canning, and drying greens; creating wealth to shop for meals; cooking; and feeding kin, buddies, and associates on usual and festive events. They use foodstuff to solder or holiday relationships and to specific contrasting emotions of concord and generosity, or enmity and envy. The interviews during this ebook show that those Mexicanas are imaginative services whose meals paintings contributes to cultural survival.

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Extra info for A Tortilla Is Like Life: Food and Culture in the San Luis Valley of Colorado (Louann Atkins Temple Women & Culture)

Sample text

It wasn’t heard at home at all, conversations in English, at that time when I was growing up. My uncle was saying that I was smart, smart, and his wife said, “Yes, she’s smart. ” So when I went to school I already understood English. I couldn’t carry on or talk very well, but all these little things that I had learned would come to my mind, all the “eat” and “play”—I mean the words. At that time the school was in Lobatos. I was one of the smartest ones because I could read English. I don’t think the young people should forget Spanish.

What we had known as la gente, la raza, los mexicanos, the Hispanic, you know? ” Teddy said that she identified herself as Hispanic or Spanish American on the census. In Spanish she might use mexicanos or hispanos. ” Her use of the term raza was not in the more widespread sense of “the Hispanic people,” as in La Raza Unida political party; for her, raza referred to the identity of the settlers who came to the valley in the nineteenth century and who knew each other by their unique spoken Spanish, different from that of Mexican immigrants.

So when I went to school I already understood English. I couldn’t carry on or talk very well, but all these little things that I had learned would come to my mind, all the “eat” and “play”—I mean the words. At that time the school was in Lobatos. I was one of the smartest ones because I could read English. I don’t think the young people should forget Spanish. If you know two languages, you’re up somewhere. You get asked for certain jobs, and most of them, if you speak both languages, they prefer you for that.

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