A Zen Approach to Bodytherapy: From Rolf to Feldenkrais to by William S. Leigh

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By William S. Leigh

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With about ten other people, I was lying on my stomach, fol­ lowing his instructions to bend the knees at right angles to the floor and to bend the feet at right angles to the lower legs, so that the soles of the feet would be parallel to the floor. "Just look at his feet," Moshe said. "They are not parallel to the floor. His feet and toes point toward the ceiling. And he thinks they are flat, at right angles to his lower leg. " Then he proceeded to give me specific instructions on how to move the feet back and forth, up and down, until my feet were parallel to the floor after several minutes.

The spine had to shorten and move for­ ward, making a greater curve in the lower back and crushing the spinal discs. His upper spine then had to change to balance the lower back curve. I worked his tight, short muscles until they softened and lengthened. The spine got longer, he got taller. That night, he got a good restful sleep for the first time in months. S. and weighed well over 200 pounds. As I went deeper into his tissues, he began to sob. They were not the normal sobs you would expect from a man experienc­ ing emotional trauma, but the pitiful sobs of a young infant—loud and strong, as if he were in extreme pain.

With about ten other people, I was lying on my stomach, fol­ lowing his instructions to bend the knees at right angles to the floor and to bend the feet at right angles to the lower legs, so that the soles of the feet would be parallel to the floor. "Just look at his feet," Moshe said. "They are not parallel to the floor. His feet and toes point toward the ceiling. And he thinks they are flat, at right angles to his lower leg. " Then he proceeded to give me specific instructions on how to move the feet back and forth, up and down, until my feet were parallel to the floor after several minutes.

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